News

PHIA mourns the loss of Senator Roger Madigan

June 4, 2018

Our thoughts this morning are with the family of former state Sen. Roger Madigan, who passed away on Saturday at the age of 88. Senator Madigan, of Luthers Mills and Harrisburg, served as chairman of the Senate Transportation Committee for many years and was a 2008 recipient of PHIA’s Transportation Advocate of the Year Award. His public service had a lasting positive impact on Pennsylvania and its residents. Funeral arrangements will be announced and are under the direction of the Gerald W. Vickery, Jr. Funeral & Cremation Services, Inc. 1093 West Main Street, Troy, PA 16947.

“Senator Madigan’s contributions to transportation in the Commonwealth are immeasurable,” said PHIA managing director Jason Wagner. “The Senator was one of the finest gentlemen PHIA has ever worked with in the General Assembly.  He will be sorely missed and PHIA extends our deepest sympathies to his family during this time.”

 

News, PHIA NEWS DIGEST

PHIA News Digest – Vol. 3, No. 20

May 21, 2018

Trillium opens its third public CNG location in Lawrence County

Trillium, along with the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation and New Castle Transit Authority celebrated the opening of the commonwealth’s newest compressed natural gas fueling station in New Castle.

Transit leaders: Lack of funding leads to negative economic consequences

A new report released by the American Public Transportation Association (APTA) warns that decades of under-investment has had a negative effect on the economy, resulting in lost jobs and declining business revenue.

Bikes vs. cars vs. pedestrians: How Philly can win the transportation culture war

What can be done to prevent tragedies like the loss of Pablo Avendano and the nearly hundred other individuals who die on Philadelphia’s streets and sidewalks each year?

Congress needs to pass a bill to fix transportation and infrastructure: Ray LaHood

Former Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood and former Governor of Pennsylvania Ed Rendell discuss what the government needs to do to rebuild and modernize infrastructure in the United States.

Failure to restore and modernize U.S. public transit results in a loss of $340 billion

Decades of under investment in America’s aging bus and rail public transit infrastructure has a negative effect on business revenue, and results in lost jobs and wages, according to a new study from the American Public Transportation Association.

PA Turnpike cracks down on $17 million in unpaid tolls

The Turnpike Commission has launched the first 19 criminal prosecutions against drivers across the state who have failed to pay.

 

News

PHIA News Digest – Vol. 3, No. 19

May 15, 2018

CSVT North more than half completed

Slated for completion in 2022, the North Section of the CSVT (Central Susquehanna Valley Transportation) Project is roughly 66 percent completed, PennDOT officials noted during a recent visit with staff at The Standard-Journal.

Volkswagen settlement money to go toward cleaner vehicles, engines

Pennsylvania will use the $118 million it received in a settlement with Volkswagen to fund grants and rebates for cleaner vehicles and engines.

Where will money for Luzerne County’s $5 vehicle registration fee go?

Luzerne County officials insist an extra $5 fee could go a long way. They want to use the newly approved $5 vehicle registration fee to fix roads and bridges. The final details have not been worked out just yet, but right now, county leaders are focusing on three bridges that really need repairs.

Improvement projects bolster public transit, communities

Governor Tom Wolf and PennDOT Secretary Leslie S. Richards announced the approval of funding for 82 projects to improve transportation alternatives and enhance mobility and public accessibility across the commonwealth.

County council approves $5 vehicle registration fee

County council approved a $5 registration fee surcharge on Tuesday on vehicles registered to county addresses, to raise funds to repair county-owned roads and bridges.

 

News

PennDOT continues strong lettings in April

May 7, 2018

PennDOT continued its 2018 construction letting season by issuing just over $210 million in projects in April, bringing the year-to-date total to almost $670 million according to numbers compiled by the Associated Pennsylvania Constructors (APC).  PennDOT finished 2017 with just over $2.578 billion in project lettings.  PennDOT forecasted the 2017 letting program to be $2.4 billion and they anticipate the same for 2018.

As in year’s past, PHIA will continue to track contract lettings on a monthly basis.

To view the full April letting report and year comparisons, click the link below.

April Letting Report* (PDF)

*The report lists the total contracts awarded at each letting date, a comparison to the same period in the previous calendar year, and letting adjustments made since the previous month. PHIA staff will track PennDOT lettings throughout the year and provide monthly update.

News

Automated speed enforcement subject of rally

May 3, 2018

A group known as PA Vision Zero descended on the Statehouse this week to urge the PA House to advance Senate Bill 172 to provide for automated speed enforcement in highway work zones, along with one of Philadelphia’s most dangerous roads, Roosevelt Boulevard.

The highway construction industry, PHIA and bicycle and pedestrian advocates have tried for several years to persuade lawmakers to implement a system similar to what Maryland put in place several years ago. Those who exceed work zone speed limits by 11 miles per hour or more have their license plate photographed and receive notice of a fine in the mail.

When the Maryland program began, 7 percent of drivers were traveling at least that fast through work zones. Once the program gained awareness, that number dropped to less than 1 percent.

“There’s absolutely no question that automated speed enforcement reduces speeding in work zones,” said PHIA Managing Director Jason Wagner. “It’s also evident that a majority of legislators support the concept. We hope the House will take up the measure and work out their differences with the version that passed overwhelmingly in the Senate.”